Heather Wolpert-Gawron

Viewing: Curriculum

Lessons to Share: 3D Printing and Design to Learn Reading & Writing

By on June 17, 2016

So I just finished my first week with my Make Writing class.  This class, as I’ve written about in the past, is intended to help those long-term EL students who have become disengaged with school and with learning.  These kids

When Life Turns on a Dime, You Discover Your Family

By on August 14, 2013

I want to tell you a little about what happened to me this summer, but I promise that it will come around and relate to school.  Cruddy hook, I know, but I wanted you to know there was a method

How to Battle Epic Paragraphing – updated

How to Battle Epic Paragraphing – updated

By on August 23, 2010

I originally wrote this post some time ago, but because it is such a problem that a teacher can detect so early on, I thought I would repost it for those who may have missed it on the last go-round. 

Curriculum Segregation and Teacher Turfiness

Curriculum Segregation and Teacher Turfiness

By on June 19, 2010

High school teachers can be so turfy. Which was one of the reasons why I received an email earlier today concerned about my curriculum for the class I’m teaching at summer school camp. In a nutshell, I’ve been given leave

Pen Tricks and Differentiation

Pen Tricks and Differentiation

By on June 13, 2010

OK, for those of you not in the pen spinning loop, I’m talking about a craze that’s preoccupying tween fingers all over the known universe, or at least in my district. Of pen spinning, or object manipulation, as a sport,

The Courtesy Contract: Building Community ‘Til the Bitter End

The Courtesy Contract: Building Community ‘Til the Bitter End

By on May 30, 2010

As the school year comes to an end, I wanted to share one of my favorite activities: something I call, The Courtesy Contract. In my book for EyeOnEducation Publishing, due out in early 2011, called Tips for Tween teachers by

Part 3 of 3: The Future of Teacher Prep Programs

Part 3 of 3: The Future of Teacher Prep Programs

By on February 26, 2010

Well, what began as mere musings, seems to have become a fully fleshed fantasy for what a teacher prep program of the future may look like. It all began in Part 1 of this series of posts. It continued in

I’ll Take that Education to Go: Individualization vs. Standardization

I’ll Take that Education to Go: Individualization vs. Standardization

By on January 21, 2010

We live in a world of double-decaf-non-fat-lattes-with-room. We live in a world that is slowly beginning to customize everything from our coffee orders to our spa treatments. But it won’t just stop with luxury items. Some teachers complain about the

The Inconsistency of School Administrations

The Inconsistency of School Administrations

By on October 17, 2009

There are just so many elements that contribute to education’s struggles, much of which many civilians never even think about. I write a lot about these elements to try to give insight from a teacher’s point of view, and to

Why I’m Jealous of Teach For America or Collaboration on the Can

Why I’m Jealous of Teach For America or Collaboration on the Can

By on September 24, 2009

I don’t mean to whine, but I’m feeling neglected. For all my questions about the eventual impact on education with TFA, I find myself a little pouty that they get all this professional development and I don’t.

Advice for a Future Department Head

Advice for a Future Department Head

By on July 22, 2009

So generally I write a post giving advice to all you new educators out there, but this time I need the advice.    I’m the new English Department Chair for my middle school, and I’ve been set to lead a group

Standards Conversation #1: Should Education Take a Tip from Starbucks?

Standards Conversation #1: Should Education Take a Tip from Starbucks?

By on July 5, 2009

Starbucks is the ultimate in differentiation.  In fact, it’s built an empire on providing individualized, one-on-one product to any member of its clientele, no questions asked.  Cute, young baristas (some with piercings, some without) hand out drinks with a smile,

Book Review: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

Book Review: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

By on June 29, 2009

You know the old commercial: “You got your chocolate in my peanut butter! Well, you got your peanut butter in my chocolate!” And just like a Peanut Butter cup, it seems that Jane Austin and Zombies go great together. Pride

The Myth of Summers Off

The Myth of Summers Off

By on May 29, 2009

“So you’re a teacher, huh?” says the umpteenth Joe know-it-all.  I know the tone, and I know what’s coming.  “Must be nice having summer’s off,” he sneers. I don’t know what mythical job this guy thinks I have, but I

Carnival of Education is in town!

Carnival of Education is in town!

By on May 27, 2009

The latest Carnival of Education is in town.  I always check out Larry Ferlazzo’s posts for some curriculum innovation as well as Scott McLeod’s just for some new perspectives on ed leadership.  And, of course, tweenteacher’s in there as well.

5 Things Teachers can do to Improve Teaching

5 Things Teachers can do to Improve Teaching

By on April 21, 2009

We all know there are many problems in education and not one bullet to solve any one of them.  We as teachers can’t do a lot about many of the factors that have huge influence on student success: parental involvement,

Twitter as Think Aloud

Twitter as Think Aloud

By on April 13, 2009

I was reading through my Digg headlines this weekend, and I happened on this article of the top 10 most extraordinary Twitter updates.  I also did some digging (no pun intended) and found articles that range in claiming that there

Spontaneous Public Displays of Art

Spontaneous Public Displays of Art

By on April 8, 2009

I can’t wait to show my 8th Grade Honors class this clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vq6b9bMBXpg. It’s a great display of the act of spreading the arts publicly and on a huge scale.   My students have been working all year on their

Where the Wild Things Are: Part II

Where the Wild Things Are: Part II

By on March 30, 2009

So I recited the book and showed the movie trailer to the students on my Interactive Whiteboard, just as I mused about in my last post.  From there, I read an old version of the “Three Little Pigs” and asked

Movie Trailer Review:  Where the Wild Things Are

Movie Trailer Review: Where the Wild Things Are

By on March 27, 2009

Yes, it’s true.  I’m reviewing a movie review.  But when you watch it, you’ll understand why. Spike Jonze of “Being John Malkovich” fame (amongst other image-rich movies and videos) is directing a movie version of the Maurice Sendak classic, Where