Heather Wolpert-Gawron

Viewing: collaboration

Pannello blog

The Invisible Strategies of Teaching: #whatpeopledontsee

By on November 23, 2015

hen you walk onto a middle school campus and even into the rooms themselves, it can look like chaos. After all, middle schoolers are wired to be active and wired to be loud. But that doesn’t mean there isn’t learning

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Lessons Students Can Learn From Mick Fanning vs. The Great White Shark

By on July 27, 2015

hat’s with shark videos? First it was the uniqueness of Left Shark in the Katy Perry halftime show. From him we learned to dance to your own groove, even in front of millions of people And now we have the

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Organizing Google Drive For Your New School Year

By on July 25, 2014

I have drunk the Google Drive Kool-Aid.  I used it daily last year, and I am now a convert.  However, as a result of my recent condition that I’m calling Googlenthusiasm, my inbox and Drive are now ready for a

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Having Any Nightmares About the Start of School Yet?

By on July 22, 2014

I posted the following on Facebook earlier today and got such a fun response, I just had to put it out there in a bigger way:   Had my first start-of-year-stress-dream last night. My collaborative tables had been replaced with

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Speech and Debate Secret Sauce: Building Community in Any Classroom

By on March 10, 2014

As I’ve recently written, I am the coach of a very successful and very large middle school speech & debate team.  It’s a huge job to coach all of these kids, but it’s amazingly rewarding.  It’s rewarding to know that

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New Shakespeare Collaborative Project: Anyone Interested?

By on September 23, 2012

Rarely do I hit up my readers for help, but I’m looking for classrooms to participate in, what I believe to be, a cool interdisciplinary Project Based Learning opportunity that combines Shakespeare and the digital era. I was talking to

What’s In a Name? – The Questionable Branding of the “Common” Core

What’s In a Name? – The Questionable Branding of the “Common” Core

By on July 14, 2012

Every staff meeting, in every school, is the same.   OK, so maybe that’s hyperbolic, but I’m sure we’ve all been there at one time or another: an administrator comes in and declares the new instructional practice du jour. There are

How “Lost” is like Education

How “Lost” is like Education

By on May 23, 2010

So here I am watching “Lost: The Final Journey,” and I heard the following exchange between the producers and cast that (as does much these days) got me thinking about education: Carlton Cruse (Producer): The first really profound moment on

“Podcasting with 70 Middle Schoolers”: CUE 2010

“Podcasting with 70 Middle Schoolers”: CUE 2010

By on March 5, 2010

Thank you to everyone who attended my session today at CUE on “Podcasting with 70 Middle Schoolers.” As promised, here is the keynote itself to peruse at your leisure. As with everything on my site, this work is licensed under

When the Aliens Attack, Will Education Unite?

When the Aliens Attack, Will Education Unite?

By on February 18, 2010

I just took a look at the recently released Metlife Survey of the American Teacher, and its section on “Effective Teaching and Leadership.”  This section of the survey reported much about the opinions of teachers and administrators, focusing much of

Why I’m Jealous of Teach For America or Collaboration on the Can

Why I’m Jealous of Teach For America or Collaboration on the Can

By on September 24, 2009

I don’t mean to whine, but I’m feeling neglected. For all my questions about the eventual impact on education with TFA, I find myself a little pouty that they get all this professional development and I don’t.

What Every 5th Grader REALLY Needs to Know

What Every 5th Grader REALLY Needs to Know

By on September 1, 2009

So I’ve become a Guy Kawasaki fan. It all started when I was searching for commencement day speeches for my Speech and Debate team to compete with. I found his “Hindsight”.

Student-Designed Schools

Student-Designed Schools

By on June 26, 2009

This year, my 8th graders all produced a multi-genre project during 4th Quarter that focused on possible careers of their choice. But I went a step further with my 8th grade Honors class. They not only had to research a

Marzano con’t & Corporate Sponsorship in Education

Marzano con’t & Corporate Sponsorship in Education

By on March 31, 2009

There’s a really interesting discussion thread going on at the Interactive Whiteboard Revolution ning.  It all began with my post recapping Robert Marzano’s position on the influence of IWB technology when he presented at the CUE conference this year.  You can

Teaching Secrets: Finding a Job That You Love

Teaching Secrets: Finding a Job That You Love

By on March 25, 2009

Know a teacher who got a pink slip?  Maybe my newest post at Teacher Magazine can help.  Click here for the article. It’s Step 1 of my Top Secret New Teacher Handbook.  Hope it creates some shortcuts, a machete even,

A teacher’s duty?

A teacher’s duty?

By on March 20, 2009

So by now I assume we’ve all heard of the sanctioned “cage fighting” in a Dallas, TX school.  As AP reports, school officials apparently condoned the use of a steel cage in which students could bare-knuckle fight their way towards

Top 10: How to Take Control of Your Teaching

Top 10: How to Take Control of Your Teaching

By on February 25, 2009

How can you take control of your teaching, both literally and internally? Read my Top 10 list that advises a teacher on how to get what you need in this demanding job of ours, how to survive it, and how to love it.

The Death of Teacher Conferences or I Can’t Believe I Miss My Canvas Bag

The Death of Teacher Conferences or I Can’t Believe I Miss My Canvas Bag

By on February 23, 2009

So, CATE (the California Association of Teachers of English) just came to an end.  The hotel was lovely.  All ran smoothly.  We were greeted with smiles aplenty, and everything ran on time.  Sheridan Blau, Kelly Gallagher, Carol Booth Olson, Taylor

Starting from scratch in teacher training

Starting from scratch in teacher training

By on February 18, 2009

I recently heard Judy Willis (of “syn-naps” fame) speak at a conference.  In her pre-teaching life, she was a neurologist and she brings her knowledge to the classroom and to her lectures.  (See my recently published article in Teacher Magazine, “My

Here’s why test scores shouldn’t be the only criteria…

Here’s why test scores shouldn’t be the only criteria…

By on February 18, 2009

OK, so my first period’s “Advanced” group went up 40% between their 1st district assessment and their 2nd. Another period went up 37%.  Even my Honors class went from 81% Advanced to 97% Advanced, with only 1 student found in