Heather Wolpert-Gawron

Viewing: assessments

Past, Present, Future: Assessments and Technology

By on April 2, 2016

“Grading, in kids’ brains, parents’ brains, administrators’ brains, and even teachers’ brains, is a final snapshot after which there is no beyond.  But if we can start thinking about assessments as a means to drive feedback, NOW you’re on to something.”

Alternative Strategies for Assessing Learning: Larry Ferlazzo Classroom Q & A Podcast

By on March 30, 2016

“Whether they’re doing a portfolio or a performance task, they still want to see How do I stack up?” I had a lot of fun being interviewed for Larry Ferlazzo’s podcast about alternatives to grading and traditional assessments.  The follow-up

Edutopia Post: How Can We Make Assessments Meaningful?

Edutopia Post: How Can We Make Assessments Meaningful?

By on August 1, 2012

My most recent post for Edutopia focuses on Meaningful Assessments.  I’m currently working on that chapter for my new book, and it’s been on the brain as of late. In this post, I talk about using the 4Cs (Creativity, Critical-Thinking,

And My Job Quality is Based on These Tests?! (Updated)

And My Job Quality is Based on These Tests?! (Updated)

By on May 28, 2010

So clearly we’ve all been thinking a lot about the necessity of test scores in making high stakes decisions. I mean, test scores seem to be used in everything these days: teacher evaluations, a student’s college or career readiness, merit

How do we “Fix the Schools?”

How do we “Fix the Schools?”

By on January 10, 2010

Ellen Berg, my colleague in The Teacher Leaders asked this very simple question the other day. I had so much fun in answering and I believe so deeply in the power of this simple question that I wanted to share

Costa’s Levels of Questioning and Student-Designed Assessments

Costa’s Levels of Questioning and Student-Designed Assessments

By on September 19, 2009

So this week I introduced Costa’s Levels of Questioning to my students. We have some teachers on my site talking about these triggers of metacognition so it compliments everyone’s efforts to enter this discussion in the classroom. Costa’s is, in

What Every 5th Grader REALLY Needs to Know

What Every 5th Grader REALLY