Heather Wolpert-Gawron

Viewing: Writers Project

Spontaneous Public Displays of Art

Spontaneous Public Displays of Art

By on April 8, 2009

I can’t wait to show my 8th Grade Honors class this clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vq6b9bMBXpg. It’s a great display of the act of spreading the arts publicly and on a huge scale.   My students have been working all year on their

Where the Wild Things Are: Part II

Where the Wild Things Are: Part II

By on March 30, 2009

So I recited the book and showed the movie trailer to the students on my Interactive Whiteboard, just as I mused about in my last post.  From there, I read an old version of the “Three Little Pigs” and asked

Teaching Secrets: Finding a Job That You Love

Teaching Secrets: Finding a Job That You Love

By on March 25, 2009

Know a teacher who got a pink slip?  Maybe my newest post at Teacher Magazine can help.  Click here for the article. It’s Step 1 of my Top Secret New Teacher Handbook.  Hope it creates some shortcuts, a machete even,

Internet Reading: The genre

Internet Reading: The genre

By on March 23, 2009

So I’m sitting here pondering the titles of the two curriculum books I am currently writing on teaching Internet Literacy, and I can’t help but wonder if reading on the Internet isn’t its own genre all together.   I mean,

Finding Your Own Theme in Life

Finding Your Own Theme in Life

By on March 20, 2009

I have an article in the new March/April issue of Imagine Magazine, put out by Johns Hopkins.  It’s a beautiful magazine, whose audience is gifted middle schoolers.  It’s always a pleasure to write for a middle school audience.  I can

A teacher’s duty?

A teacher’s duty?

By on March 20, 2009

So by now I assume we’ve all heard of the sanctioned “cage fighting” in a Dallas, TX school.  As AP reports, school officials apparently condoned the use of a steel cage in which students could bare-knuckle fight their way towards

Extreme Makeover: Classroom Edition

Extreme Makeover: Classroom Edition

By on March 11, 2009

There’s been so much talk lately of deep-needed reforms for education, but we neglect just how powerful a simple makeover can be.  I’m lucky to currently work at a school that has a patch of green, which fixes the broken

CUE Conference: Podcasting with 70 Middle Schoolers – RU Crazy?

CUE Conference: Podcasting with 70 Middle Schoolers – RU Crazy?

By on March 7, 2009

So here’s my Keynote presentation for all of you who wanted to flip through it for some reminders.  To open up my handouts, click here.   Hope you all enjoyed the session, and feel free to drop me a line

The Importance of The Classroom Library

The Importance of The Classroom Library

By on March 1, 2009

I believe a classroom library is the heartbeat of a teacher’s environment.  It is the window into their own personality, and it reflects the importance of literacy in the classroom.  I believe every teacher, no matter the subject taught, should

Teacher Magazine: Test Prep Magic

Teacher Magazine: Test Prep Magic

By on February 27, 2009

Check out my article in yesterday’s Teacher Magazine outlining 5 little-thought-about strategies in teaching test prep.  Hope it helps you during your own Test Prep season. -Tweenteacher

DARPA to create metacognitively aware robots

DARPA to create metacognitively aware robots

By on February 24, 2009

The Register reports that DARPA (Defense Advance Research Projects Agency) is currently researching how to create robots that are “like some self-aware computer systems capable of “meta-reasoning” and “introspection…”  Their goal is to “Provide machines with an ability to reason

The Death of Teacher Conferences or I Can’t Believe I Miss My Canvas Bag

The Death of Teacher Conferences or I Can’t Believe I Miss My Canvas Bag

By on February 23, 2009

So, CATE (the California Association of Teachers of English) just came to an end.  The hotel was lovely.  All ran smoothly.  We were greeted with smiles aplenty, and everything ran on time.  Sheridan Blau, Kelly Gallagher, Carol Booth Olson, Taylor

Am I So Past My Prime?

Am I So Past My Prime?

By on February 21, 2009

Somehow, and maybe I’m reading into it here, I feel a little written off already.  Education Week is reporting that some districts are pondering the possibility of “front-loading” new teacher salaries, increasing their compensation earlier in their career to aid

“I Statements” in Expository Writing

“I Statements” in Expository Writing

By on February 18, 2009

This weekend I’m presenting at the CATE conference in Santa Clara, CA.  It’s a session on developing high level, critical-thinking commentary in expository writing.  My feeling is that great commentary is the Voice in Expository, it is the Show, Not

Starting from scratch in teacher training

Starting from scratch in teacher training

By on February 18, 2009

I recently heard Judy Willis (of “syn-naps” fame) speak at a conference.  In her pre-teaching life, she was a neurologist and she brings her knowledge to the classroom and to her lectures.  (See my recently published article in Teacher Magazine, “My

Test Prep-Bubbling Power

Test Prep-Bubbling Power

By on February 2, 2009

So I looked at my 8th grade students’ scores after they took the MMA and sighed.  Their scores sucked.  

Is EdTech changing how students think or is it addressing the changes in student thinking?

Is EdTech changing how students think or is it addressing the changes in student thinking?

By on January 29, 2009

Science Daily is reporting that there has been a shift in how students are thinking as a result of their use of technology.  They believe it possibly lowers critical thinking skills and analysis.  Additionally, they wonder just how much schools

My New Interactive Whiteboard…an update

My New Interactive Whiteboard…an update

By on January 28, 2009

OK, you know when you get a new puppy and you love it and you couldn’t live without it and then you find out it has hip dysplasia?   That’s a little of what my relationship is like with my

Congrats Neil Gaiman!

Congrats Neil Gaiman!

By on January 28, 2009

All hail the mighty Neil Gaiman!  I can’t say that I actually called it, but I did recommend The Graveyard Book, did I not?   Yes, it seems The Sandman himself has gone and won the Newbery Award.  So congrats

Asking for Student Opinions Isn’t Risky, It’s Rewarding

Asking for Student Opinions Isn’t Risky, It’s Rewarding

By on January 24, 2009

I was reading this great article from Slate Magazine about the cheese that is Billy Joel.  And I thought back to many a car trip singing his “Themes from an Italian Restaurant.”  I also remembered just how many times I’d