Heather Wolpert-Gawron

Viewing: Curriculum

5 Non-Fiction Articles to Pair with High School Literature (December)

By on December 23, 2015

    1. Dumb Kids’ Class Written by: Mark Bowden Published on: The Atlantic “My bet is that when a comprehensive inventory is made of my generation, it will be found that not one person from a smart kids’ class

5 Nonfiction + Novels Series: The Middle School Edition for Dec. 2015

By on December 22, 2015

My newest post is the first in a series  in which I’m collaborating with Talks with Teachers podcaster and blogger, Brian Sztabnik. Brian not only moderates the #aplitchat on Twitter but also writes the 5 Nonfiction + Novels series for

The Invisible Strategies of Teaching: #whatpeopledontsee

By on November 23, 2015

hen you walk onto a middle school campus and even into the rooms themselves, it can look like chaos. After all, middle schoolers are wired to be active and wired to be loud. But that doesn’t mean there isn’t learning

Who Was I In Middle School? A Reflection + Free Downloadable

By on November 10, 2015

t times, seeing the diversity in my own students, I’ve wondered who I was when I was in middle school and what really drove my tween’s brain.  So I created a Tip 10 list of memories to help me reflect

Lessons Students Can Learn From Mick Fanning vs. The Great White Shark

By on July 27, 2015

hat’s with shark videos? First it was the uniqueness of Left Shark in the Katy Perry halftime show. From him we learned to dance to your own groove, even in front of millions of people And now we have the

Using Ant-Man In The Classroom

By on July 24, 2015

just watched Ant-Man with my 9 year-old, and we both walked away with a cinematic smile on our faces. For him, it was a movie of laughs and of just the right level of suspense. It didn’t have the darkness

Visual of my Edutopia post: “The Power of I Don’t Know”

By on October 29, 2014

recently wrote an post for Edutopia called “The Power of I Don’t Know.”  It focuses on our need as teachers to release being the information authority in the room and instead to hand over the reins to the students themselves. 

Training Judges for a Speech Tournament: A Reflection on How Students (Even Adults) Learn

By on October 26, 2014

e just finished hosting our first quarter speech tournament on Friday night.  Our league, to our knowledge, is one of the largest middle school leagues in the country, and the coaches meet frequently to ensure that our tournaments run as

Organizing Google Drive For Your New School Year

By on July 25, 2014

I have drunk the Google Drive Kool-Aid.  I used it daily last year, and I am now a convert.  However, as a result of my recent condition that I’m calling Googlenthusiasm, my inbox and Drive are now ready for a

So You Think You Can Dance + Math = STEAM

By on June 9, 2014

I just wanted to share a quick classroom resource today that I stumbled on in my TiVO feed. I admit it, I’m a So You Think You Can Dance geek.  It’s always been a great show in terms of modeling

Speech and Debate Secret Sauce: Building Community in Any Classroom

By on March 10, 2014

As I’ve recently written, I am the coach of a very successful and very large middle school speech & debate team.  It’s a huge job to coach all of these kids, but it’s amazingly rewarding.  It’s rewarding to know that

Let’s Talk About Speech, Baby: Speech & Debate and the Common Core

By on February 2, 2014

Besides being a Language Arts teacher, I am also a Speech and Debate coach.  I haven’t written about it too much, not for any reason other than I spend a lot of time geeking out over curriculum design in teaching

What do Jeff Wilhelm and Ashton Kutcher Have in Common? : Teaching for Character

By on December 23, 2013

Earlier this December, I attended the UCI Writing Project annual conference.  Every year, this conference douses a teacher in strategies to teach writing and literacy, and every year I come away with valuable methods and implementation goals.  This year, the

Tips on Embedding Evidence: Writing with Numeracy

By on December 12, 2013

As we journey deeper into the world of Common Core, the need for factual evidence rather than emotional opinion becomes more and more vital.  So that got me thinking in a more targeted way: as an ELA teacher, what are

Tween Brains, Part III: How to Work It Out In The Classroom

By on October 30, 2013

 In part 1 and part 2 of my series on the tween brain, I covered why teachers need to become brain hobbiests and some key terms when learning about the brain.  In this final post on the tween’s crazy cranium,

Going Paperless: The Digital Binder

By on September 13, 2013

I wanted to share a bit of what I’m doing in my various classrooms as a means to go paperless.  To me, the need to go paperless is about two things: 1. The reams of paper that are used in

Ring in the New Year by Remembering the Good

Ring in the New Year by Remembering the Good

By on December 26, 2012

The weekend after Sandy Hook (see my brief thoughts here) I began thinking of ways to access the topic in different and more effective methods for my classes.  They had left on that Friday not knowing what had happened.  Of

New Shakespeare Collaborative Project: Anyone Interested?

By on September 23, 2012

Rarely do I hit up my readers for help, but I’m looking for classrooms to participate in, what I believe to be, a cool interdisciplinary Project Based Learning opportunity that combines Shakespeare and the digital era. I was talking to

Middle School Classroom Management Tip: Collaboration and Fluid Grouping Trick

By on September 1, 2012

Here’s a little fluid grouping trick I’ve written about in the past.  I thought it might be fun to just record something to make it a little more tangible.  The basic thought is that you can insert a little content

Edutopia Post: How Can We Make Assessments Meaningful?

Edutopia Post: How Can We Make Assessments Meaningful?

By on August 1, 2012

My most recent post for Edutopia focuses on Meaningful Assessments.  I’m currently working on that chapter for my new book, and it’s been on the brain as of late. In this post, I talk about using the 4Cs (Creativity, Critical-Thinking,